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Summer 2016 On-Campus Writing Workshops

The Creative Writing Program offers introductory and intermediate writing workshops throughout the summer.

Our summer writing workshops are open to NYU and visiting students. NYU students may register for the summer term via Albert starting February 17, 2016. Visiting students should refer to the Summer in NYC website for registration information and instructions. High school students should consult the NYU Precollege website to learn more about our precollege offerings.

SUMMER 2016 WORKSHOP SCHEDULE
Summer Session I: May 23 - July 5, 2016
Summer Session II: July 6 - August 16, 2016

*Interested in taking a creative writing workshop in summer 2016? Fill out this form for news and updates. And follow the NYU Creative Writing Program on Facebook and Twitter!*



COURSE OFFERINGS

CRWRI-UA 815 Creative Writing: Introduction to Fiction and Poetry (Multiple Sections)
No prerequisite. 4 points.
The popular introductory workshop offers an exciting introduction to the basic elements of poetry and fiction—with in-class writing, take-home reading and writing assignments, and substantive discussions of craft. The course is structured as a workshop, which means that students will receive feedback from their instructor and their fellow writers in a roundtable setting, and should be prepared to offer their classmates responses to their work. 

Summer Session I
Section 2
TR 1:30pm-4:40pm
Dionne Ford

Section 6
MW 1:30pm-4:40pm
Coco Mellors Provisional Syllabus

Summer Session II
Section 1
MW 1:30pm-4:40pm
Steven Potter Provisional Syllabus

Quite simply, writers read and write a lot. In this class we will read widely and critically, defining not just what we like and dislike, but why, and mining for techniques that might improve our own work. The end goal is to get you thinking and acting like a writer.  
—Steve Potter

Section 3
TR 1:30pm-4:40pm
Alisha Kaplan Provisional Syllabus

We will explore what makes a story a story and what makes a poem a poem and what happens when those lines are blurred. You’ll learn how to read as a writer, how to discuss poetry and fiction critically yet compassionately, and how to cultivate a writing life. You’ll be introduced to a wide spectrum of writers with different styles, from the early twentieth century to the present.
—Alisha Kaplan

Precollege Sections
(For High School Students)
We offer two precollege sections of CRWRI-UA 815 Creative Writing: Introduction to Fiction & Poetry (Section 60
and Section 61). Both sections meet TR 1:30-4:40 during Summer Session II. Please visit the NYU Precollege website for more information and application instructions. 

Jihyun Yun, Section 060
Provisional Syllabus

Catherine Pikula, Section 061
Provisional Syllabus

CRWRI-UA 816 001 Intermediate Fiction Workshop (Summer Session II)
MW 4:00-7:10 Provisional Syllabus
Garth Greenwell, author of What Belongs to You 

"I’m fascinated by how often the most emotionally resonant passages in a writer’s work, passages that linger long after details of character or plot have faded, are those that are most intensely invested in the rendering of sense experience. We’ll begin investigating this by asking what makes for good description, and the different uses to which description can be put. This will become a discussion of setting, and of how setting can function not just as the backdrop to a story, but also to develop character, plot, and theme. We’ll use readings from a great range of writers to help us think about these questions." —Garth Greenwell

CRWRI-UA 817 001 Intermediate Poetry Workshop (Summer Session II)
TR 4:00-7:10 Provisional Syllabus
Thomas Dooley, author of Trespass

Intermediate Poetry Workshop: A City Around / A City Within. "In this noisy life, how can we turn our attention to the quiet voice deep within? For this class, we will press our ear to great poems and ask them to guide and give courage to our writing, as we work towards clearer, bolder intention. We will engage with visual art, performance, the city around us and the city within to create vibrant portraits of our own experience." —Thomas Dooley